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High Cholesterol: What You Need To Know

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In this video, Dr. Huntoon discusses cholesterol, the causes of your cholesterol being elevated and what you can do naturally to lower your cholesterol naturally.

Click on any of the links to your right and find the information you need to take control of your cholesterol levels without harmful, lifetime medications.

Read the article below for complete understanding for your health.

High Blood Cholesterol:  What You Need To Know 

  

Why Is Cholesterol Important?                                         Consider Shop With The Doc

Your blood cholesterol level may have a lot to do with your chances of getting heart disease. High blood cholesterol is one of the major risk factors for heart disease. A risk factor is a condition that increases your chance of getting a disease. In fact, the higher your blood cholesterol level, the greater your risk for developing heart disease or having a heart attack. Heart disease is the number one killer of women and men in the United States. Each year, more than a million Americans have heart attacks, and about 55 percent of those people die from heart disease.

How Does Cholesterol Lead To Heart Disease?

When there is too much cholesterol (a fat-like substance) in your blood, it builds up in the walls of your arteries. Over time, this buildup causes "hardening of the arteries" so that arteries become narrowed and blood flow to the heart is slowed down or blocked. The blood carries oxygen to the heart, and if enough blood and oxygen cannot reach your heart, you may suffer chest pain. If the blood supply to a portion of the heart is completely cut off by a blockage, the result is a heart attack.

High blood cholesterol itself does not cause symptoms, so many people are unaware that their cholesterol level is too high. It is important to find out what your cholesterol numbers are because lowering cholesterol levels that are too high lessens the risk for developing heart disease and reduces the chance of a heart attack or dying of heart disease, even if you already have it. Cholesterol lowering is important for everyone--younger, middle age, and older adults; women and men; and people with or without heart disease.

What Do Your Cholesterol Numbers Mean?

Everyone age 20 and older should have their cholesterol measured at least once every 5 years. It is best to have a blood test called a "lipoprotein profile" to find out your cholesterol numbers. This blood test is done after a 9- to 12-hour fast and gives information about your:

  • Total cholesterol
  • LDL (bad) cholesterol--the main source of cholesterol buildup and blockage in the arteries
  • HDL (good) cholesterol--helps keep cholesterol from building up in the arteries
  • Triglycerides--another form of fat in your blood

If it is not possible to get a lipoprotein profile done, knowing your total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol can give you a general idea about your cholesterol levels. If your total cholesterol is 200 mg/dL* or more or if your HDL is less than 40 mg/dL, you will need to have a lipoprotein profile done. See how your cholesterol numbers compare to the tables below.

Total Cholesterol Level Category
Less than 200 mg/dL Desirable
200-239 mg/dL Borderline High
240 mg/dL and above High
* Cholesterol levels are measured in milligrams (mg) of cholesterol per deciliter (dL) of blood.
LDL Cholesterol Level LDL-Cholesterol Category
Less than 100 mg/dL Optimal
100-129 mg/dL Near optimal/above optimal
130-159 mg/dL Borderline high
160-189 mg/dL High
190 mg/dL and above Very high
 

HDL (good) cholesterol protects against heart disease, so for HDL, higher numbers are better. A level less than 40 mg/dL is low and is considered a major risk factor because it increases your risk for developing heart disease. HDL levels of 60 mg/dL or more help to lower your risk for heart disease.

Triglycerides can also raise heart disease risk. Levels that are high (100-199 mg/dL) or extremely high (200 mg/dL or more) may need treatment in some people.

What Affects Cholesterol Levels?

A variety of things can affect cholesterol levels. These are things you can do something about:

  • Diet. Saturated fat and cholesterol in the food you eat may make your blood cholesterol level go up. The amount of Completely Refined And Processed (CRAP) foods also matters. Reducing the amount of CRAP food, along with reducing saturated fat and cholesterol in your diet can help to lower your blood cholesterol level.
  • Weight. Being overweight is a risk factor for heart disease. It also tends to increase your cholesterol. Losing weight can help lower your LDL and total cholesterol levels, as well as raise your HDL and lower your triglyceride levels.
  • Physical Activity. Not being physically active is a risk factor for heart disease. Regular aerobic activity can help lower LDL (bad) cholesterol and raise HDL (good) cholesterol levels. It also helps you lose weight. You should try to be aerobically active for 30 minutes on most, if not all, days.

Things you cannot do anything about also can affect cholesterol levels. These include:

  • Age and Gender. As women and men get older, their cholesterol levels rise. Before the age of menopause, women have lower total cholesterol levels than men of the same age. After the age of menopause, women's LDL levels tend to rise.
  • Heredity. Your genes partly determine how much cholesterol your body makes. High blood cholesterol can run in families.

What Is Your Risk of Developing Heart Disease or Having a Heart Attack?

In general, the higher your LDL level and the more risk factors you have (other than LDL), the greater your chances of developing heart disease or having a heart attack. Some people are at high risk for a heart attack because they already have heart disease. Other people are at high risk for developing heart disease because they have diabetes (which is a strong risk factor) or a combination of risk factors for heart disease. Follow these steps to find out your risk for developing heart disease. 

Step 1: Check the table below to see how many of the listed risk factors you have; these are the risk factors that affect your LDL goal.

Major Risk Factors That Affect Your LDL Goal 

  • Cigarette smoking
  • High blood pressure (140/90 mmHg or higher or on blood pressure medication)
  • Low HDL cholesterol (less than 40 mg/dL)*
  • Family history of early heart disease (heart disease in father or brother before age 55; heart disease in mother or sister before age 65)
  • Age (men 45 years or older; women 55 years or older)

* If your HDL cholesterol is 60 mg/dL or higher, subtract 1 from your total count.

Even though obesity and physical inactivity are not counted in this list, they are conditions that need to be corrected.

Step 2: How many major risk factors do you have? If you have 2 or more risk factors in the table above, use the attached risk scoring tables (which include your cholesterol levels) to find your risk score. Risk score refers to the chance of having a heart attack in the next 10 years, given as a percentage. My risk score is ________%.

Step 3: Use your medical history, number of risk factors, and risk score to find your risk of developing heart disease or having a heart attack in the table below.

If You Have You Are in Category
Heart disease, diabetes, or risk score more than 20%*   I. High Risk
2 or more risk factors and risk score 10-20% II. Next Highest Risk
2 or more risk factors and risk score less than 10% III. Moderate Risk
0 or 1 risk factor IV. Low-to-Moderate Risk
 

* Means that more than 20 of 100 people in this category will have a heart attack within 10 years.

My risk category is ______________________.

The Alternative Perspective

Treating High Cholesterol 

The main goal of cholesterol-lowering treatment is to lower your LDL level enough to reduce your risk of developing heart disease or having a heart attack. The higher your risk, the lower your LDL goal will be. To find your LDL goal, see the boxes below for your risk category. There are two main ways to lower your cholesterol:

  • Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes (TLC)--includes a cholesterol-lowering diet (called the TLC diet), physical activity, nutritional supplementation and weight management. TLC is for anyone whose LDL is above the ideal. Working with a Holistic Chiropractor who can help you develop these changes is warranted. By taking specific whole food supplements specific to your personal health needs is ideal and your Holistic Chiropractor can advise you with this. Reducing the amount of Completely Refined And Processed (CRAP) food in your diet will be the biggest difference maker in lowering your cholesterol levels.
  • Drug Treatment--if cholesterol-lowering drugs are needed, they are used together with TLC treatment to help lower your LDL. Beware of possible side-effects and be sure to have your Medical Doctor work closely with your Holistic Chiropractor.

If you are in...

  • Category I, Highest Risk, your LDL goal is less than 100 mg/dL. You will need to begin the TLC diet and Whole Food Supplementation treatment to reduce your high risk even if your LDL is below 100 mg/dL. If your LDL is 100 or above, you will need to start Whole Food Supplementation treatment at the same time as the TLC diet. If your LDL is below 100 mg/dL, you may also need to start drug treatment together with the TLC diet if your doctor finds your risk is very high, for example if you had a recent heart attack or have both heart disease and diabetes.
  • Category II, Next Highest Risk, your LDL goal is less than 130 mg/dL. If your LDL is 130 mg/dL or above, you will need to begin treatment with the TLC diet and Whole Food Supplementation treatment. If your LDL is 130 mg/dL or more after 3 months on the TLC diet and Whole Food Supplementation treatment, you may need drug treatment along with the TLC diet and Whole Food Supplementation treatment. If your LDL is less than 130 mg/dL, you will need to follow the heart healthy diet for all Americans, which allows a little more saturated fat and cholesterol than the TLC diet.
  • Category III, Moderate Risk, your LDL goal is less than 130 mg/dL. If your LDL is 130 mg/dL or above, you will need to begin the TLC diet with Whole Food Supplementation treatment. If your LDL is 160 mg/dL or more after you have tried the TLC diet for 3 months with Whole Food Supplementation treatment, you may need drug treatment along with the TLC diet and the Whole Food Supplementation treatment. If your LDL is less than 130 mg/dL, you will need to follow the heart healthy diet for all Americans.
  • Category IV, Low-to-Moderate Risk, your LDL goal is less than 160 mg/dL. If your LDL is 160 mg/dL or above, you will need to begin the TLC diet with Whole Food Supplementation treatment. If your LDL is still 160 mg/dL or more after 3 months on the TLC diet with Whole Food Supplementation treatment, you may need drug treatment along with the TLC diet to lower your LDL, especially if your LDL is 190 mg/dL or more. If your LDL is less than 160 mg/dL, you will need to follow the heart healthy diet for all Americans.

To reduce your risk for heart disease or keep it low, it is very important to control any other risk factors you may have such as high blood pressure and smoking.

Lowering Cholesterol With Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes (TLC)

TLC is a set of things you can do to help lower your LDL cholesterol. The main parts of TLC are:

  • The TLC Diet. This is a low-saturated-fat, low-cholesterol eating plan that calls for less than 7percent of calories from saturated fat and less than 200 mg of dietary cholesterol per day. The TLC diet recommends only enough calories to maintain a desirable weight and avoid weight gain. If your LDL is not lowered enough by reducing your saturated fat and cholesterol intakes, the amount of soluble fiber in your diet can be increased. Certain food products that contain plant stanols or plant sterols can also be added to the TLC diet to boost its LDL-lowering power.
  • Weight Management. Losing weight if you are overweight can help lower LDL and is especially important for those with a cluster of risk factors that includes high triglyceride and/or low HDL levels and being overweight with a large waist measurement (more than 40 inches for men and more than 35 inches for women).
  • Physical Activity. Regular physical activity (45 minutes of Aerobic activity on most, if not all, days) is recommended for everyone. It can help raise HDL and lower LDL and is especially important for those with high triglyceride and/or low HDL levels who are overweight with a large waist measurement.

The Medical Perspective

Drug Treatment 

Even if you begin drug treatment to lower your cholesterol, you will need to continue your treatment with lifestyle changes. This will keep the dose of medicine as low as possible, and lower your risk in other ways as well. There are several types of drugs available for cholesterol lowering including statins, bile acid sequestrants, nicotinic acid, fibric acids, and cholesterol absorption inhibitors. Your doctor can help decide which type of drug is best for you. The statin drugs are very effective in lowering LDL levels and are safe for most people. Potential side-effects of these popular drugs are the increased potential for developing Diabetes. Bile acid sequestrants also lower LDL and can be used alone or in combination with statin drugs. Again, the potential for Diabetes is greatly increased by using these medications. Nicotinic acid lowers LDL and triglycerides and raises HDL. Fibric acids lower LDL somewhat but are used mainly to treat high triglyceride and low HDL levels. Cholesterol absorption inhibitors lower LDL and can be used alone or in combination with statin drugs. Again the risk for Diabetes and other more serious health concerns needs to be understood. Talk with your medical doctor or your pharmacist to determine if there are better methods available.

Once your LDL goal has been reached, your medical doctor may prescribe treatment for high triglycerides and/or a low HDL level, if present. The treatment includes losing weight if needed, increasing physical activity, quitting smoking, and possibly taking a drug.

Your Solution

Alternative Treatment and Hope

Working with a Holistic Chiropractor who can help you develop a well-rounded, multifaceted approach to restoring balance in your body by addressing life-style and dietary changes will be best for your overall health. Whole Food Supplementation is the best initial change anyone can make when looking to restore balance and address the underlying cause of elevated cholesterol. Eliminating or greatly reducing the Completely Refined And Processed (CRAP) foods from your diet while starting on specific Heart Health Whole Food Supplements will create the most amount of change in the shortest time.

Developing a healthy life-style with proper guidance from your Holistic Chiropractor is the best prevention when considering how to approach your health.

Acupuncture, Homeopathy or Naturopathy may also be considered when looking to restore balance and harmony to your body.

Resources

For more information about lowering cholesterol and lowering your risk for heart disease, write to the NHLBI Health Information Center, P.O. Box 30105, Bethesda, MD, 20824-0105 or call 301-592-8573, or visit the Web sites listed below:

  • "Live Healthier, Live Longer"--information on cholesterol lowering (www.nhlbi.nih.gov/chd)
  • "Aim for a Healthy Weight" (www.nhlbi.nih.gov)
  • "Your Guide to Lowering High Blood Pressure" (www.nhlbi.nih.gov/hbp)
  • www.nutrition.gov
  • www.fitness.gov
  • www.cdc.gov/tobacco
  • "Healthfinder"--a free gateway to reliable consumer health and human services information developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (www.healthfinder.gov)
  • "MedlinePlus"--up-to-date, quality health care information from the National Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health (www.medlineplus.gov)

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